Since it’s mainstream discovery, juice detoxing has been a popular, yet controversial, method of cleansing your body.   Some swear that by consuming the liquid goods from the likes of kale, wheatgrass, cauliflower, broccoli, carrots and apples, the pounds shed right off.  That might be true but it often serves as a short-term salvation because a key component of  life-long viability is maintaining a lifestyle of moderation, not extremes.  The idea of abstaining from solid food consumption from anywhere from a few days to a few weeks has raised eyebrows from many nutritionists, and health professionals.  With that said, juicing may not be for everyone – here are our top points to consider before juicing:

 

If you live an active lifestyle

Pioneer juicing company, BluePrint coins one of its flagship cleanses, the Renovation Cleanse, as the choice for virgin juicers.  The entire regimen consists of six daily juices, ranging from the usual green suspects to nut-based milks, and amounts to a mere 1,070 calories daily[1].   The cleanse’s main staple is the green juice, which comes in only at 130 calories.

In some cases,  (especially for New York commuters) you can burn 130 calories during a morning trek to work – it’s a workout without you even realizing it!   Add in your daily workout routine and you can burn up to 700-1000 calories.  A juice cleanse may not be enough to sustain a balanced diet if you’re using your body for continuous , daily,  high powered activities.

If you have food intolerances…to yes, even fruits and veggies.

Like anything in life, there are different stokes for different folks.  None can be truer for the food you eat.  A large percentage of people, especially those that are wheat-free, may prove to be intolerant to various raw vegetables and fruits.[2]  Other conditions such as IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) have also shown adverse reactions to raw veggies, though suffered of such digestive ailments have been known to tolerate raw juices more favorably.

One thing to note is that a new method of juicing, such as the cold-press methods, prides itself on being heat-free, which can be a free pass for pathogens on your veggies.  Make sure you wash your veggies thoroughly if you are juicing at home.

On the flip side, those that are fiber-deficient may reap more health benefits by consuming vegetables & fruits whole, as that is a sure way to retain the many grams of fibers our plantae foods have to offer.

You’re diabetic, or rather; you just don’t want to increase your sugar intake

If you are prone to any chronic health conditions, such as kidney disease, or diabetes, maintaining a balanced diet is of utmost importance.  While many pressed juices are based on leafy greens, those prepared your local juice bar can contain tons of sugar.   A spicy lemonade?  A splash of grapefruit and apple? Sugar, sugar, sugar.[3] In cases like this, it’s important to consider the amount of sugar that may be typically added to your juice if you are not making it yourself.

All being said, juicing in moderation is not harmful.   You can try replacing one meal with a juice, or drinking the more protein-based kind (such as those based on nut milks) as a replenishing post-workout snack.  It’s certainly better to take-in a tall helping of a raw juice than your deli’s egg and cheddar bagel sandwich :)   Like with anything involving your mind and body,  do your research and proceed with what works best for you —juicing ain’t one size fits all!

 

In the  New York City area? Check out some of our favorite juice bars:

  • Liquiteria: Coined as the city’s original cold-pressed juice. Based on punches of spicy ginger and cayenne for those who like a little zing in their tonics. http://liquiteria.com/locations.php
  • Organic Avenue:  With 11 stores in Manhattan, Organic Avenue has become a mainstay for juice and raw food enthusiasts. Come here for the Tumeric Tonic, a tangy concoction for the days you don’t feel well. http://www.organicavenue.com/
  • Terri: Be sure to try the Green Power Smoothies.  It’s not a juice per se, but the richness of the almond butter and soymilk makes it a perfect remedy for your sore glutes thanks to all those reps in your Total Body Conditioning class. http://terrinyc.com

 

 

Have a favorite juice bar you’d like to share? Tell us in the comments below!



Sources:

  • [1] Blue Print Cleanse
  • [2] Livestrong.com
  • [3] PBS.org
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